Net Neutrality is dead; what does that mean for my ISP?

Whilst I continue to quietly vomit into a bag, here is how your ISP is reacting to the Trumpkin overturn of net neutrality:

Comcast: Comcast says it currently doesn’t block, throttle content, or offer paid fast lanes, but hasn’t committed to not doing so in the future.
AT&T: AT&T has committed to not blocking or throttling websites in the future. However, its stance around fast lanes is unclear.
Verizon: Verizon indicates that, at least in the immediate future, it will not block legal content. As for throttling and fast lanes, the company has no stance, and even seems to be excited to use the absence of rules to its advantage.
T-Mobile: T-Mobile makes no commitments to not throttle content or offer paid fast lanes and is unclear on its commitment to not blocking sites and services. It’s already involved in programs that advantage some services over others.
Sprint: Sprint makes no commitments on net neutrality, but suggests it doesn’t have plans to offer a service that would block sites.
Charter (Spectrum): Charter doesn’t make any guarantees, but the company indicates that it’s currently committed to not blocking or throttling customers.
Cox: Cox says it won’t block or throttle content, even without net neutrality. It won’t make commitments on zero-rating or paid fast lanes.
Altice USA (Optimum and SuddenLink): Altice doesn’t currently block or throttle and suggests it will keep those policies, though without an explicit commitment. The company doesn’t comment on prioritizing one service over another.
Google Fi and Google Fiber: Google doesn’t make any promises regarding throttling and paid prioritization. However, it is the only company to state that it believes paid prioritization would be harmful.

 

In addition to ditching its own net neutrality rules, the Federal Communications Commission also plans to tell state and local governments that they cannot impose local laws regulating broadband service. This detail was revealed by senior FCC officials in a phone briefing with reporters today, and it is a victory for broadband providers that asked for widespread preemption of state laws. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai’s proposed order finds that state and local laws must be preempted if they conflict with the U.S. government’s policy of deregulating broadband Internet service, FCC officials said. The FCC will vote on the order at its December 14 meeting. It isn’t clear yet exactly how extensive the preemption will be. Preemption would clearly prevent states from imposing net neutrality laws similar to the ones being repealed by the FCC, but it could also prevent state laws related to the privacy of Internet users or other consumer protections. Pai’s staff said that states and other localities do not have jurisdiction over broadband because it is an interstate service and that it would subvert federal policy for states and localities to impose their own rules.

Hackers steal the personal data of 57 million customers and drivers from Uber.

Compromised data from the October 2016 attack included names, email addresses and phone numbers of 50 million Uber riders around the world, the company told Bloomberg on Tuesday. The personal information of about 7 million drivers were accessed as well, including some 600,000 U.S. driver’s license numbers. No Social Security numbers, credit card details, trip location info or other data were taken, Uber said. At the time of the incident, Uber was negotiating with U.S. regulators investigating separate claims of privacy violations. Uber now says it had a legal obligation to report the hack to regulators and to drivers whose license numbers were taken. Instead, the company paid hackers $100,000 to delete the data and keep the breach quiet. Uber said it believes the information was never used but declined to disclose the identities of the attackers.

Here’s how the hack went down: Two attackers accessed a private GitHub coding site used by Uber software engineers and then used login credentials they obtained there to access data stored on an Amazon Web Services account that handled computing tasks for the company. From there, the hackers discovered an archive of rider and driver information. Later, they emailed Uber asking for money, according to the company.

California, China defy U.S. climate retreat with new cleantech agreement

 

California Governor Jerry Brown is in China this week and attended a Clean Energy Forum on Tuesday in Beijing. Reuters wrote that Brown has called President Trump’s recent Paris Agreement decision “insane,” and in a speech today, he criticized policy makers that were “resisting reality.” Brown apparently told reporters at the Beijing forum that the failure of leadership from the US was “only temporary.”

Reuters also noted that “US Secretary of Energy Rick Perry, who was at the same conference, declined to take questions from reporters.”

Brown’s agreement with Jiangsu Province (PDF) will also open the possibility of developing an emissions trading market that works with California’s emissions trading system. China is set to implement a carbon trading program this year, and California has an ongoing cap-and-trade program that’s linked to the program in Quebec, Canada. However, the pledge to link with China’s market may be a formality for now. Ma Aimin, a deputy director general of China’s National Centre for Climate Change Strategy and International Cooperation, told Reuters that “It will be a long time before there is true cooperation with California, whose market is just at a regional stage and is hard to link up with the Chinese market.”

I stopped using the Netflix Android app today and here’s why.

…because they intentionally broke it. Thanks, and drive safely.

Seriously, Netflix have decided that their Android app shall not run on rooted devices, and since every screen I own is rooted, 🙁

 

Netflix has long been wary of the Android platform over root and piracy concerns, so much so that it took years for the service to come to Android at all. Blocking rooted devices makes a certain amount of sense from its point of view, even if the vast majority of root users aren’t using it for anything nefarious, but blocking phones simply because the bootloader is unlocked is going to cause a lot of headaches. Unlocking the bootloader on a phone will cause it to fail the SafetyNet check for Google Play, even if the phone’s software hasn’t actually been modified, and can be needed for processes like flashing sideloaded updates and even flashing the Android O Developer Preview.

     San Francisco is notorious for its jaw-dropping real estate prices. The median rent for a one-bedroom apartment stands at $3,460 a month. But it’s not just housing expenses that will eat away at your paycheck. In general, the total cost of living in San Francisco is 62.6% higher than the US average.

How expensive is San Francisco? – Business Insider

www.businessinsider.com/how-expensive-is-san-francisco-2015-9